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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
there are maybe two categories of copulation. those having political power. it is a matter of foreign policy. the other category deals with millions of people for which you have information from private service providers. you can ask them to provide information before providing it to the nsa. first, you have the harvest everything. this is under the category of population outside the scope of international security. which is quite wider than other countries. it is not a solution that we have in europe, and that is why when we see this data collected, we cannot only think of fighting against terrorism, but also thinking about offering things like that. >> we say it is about stopping terrorists, but is it about having a competitive edge, trolling for consumer behaviors and getting an edge on the competition in an economic war rather than a war on terrorism? >> everybody is paying everybody. they collect data. imagine 42% increase since 2010. everybody is collaborating with this kind of cyber espionage and criminality. it is not a question of one or the other, everyone is doing that. in 2012, t
frank discussions. mark, you and i have covered foreign policy a long time. this is a very unhappy group of people. to a certain extent there's spying everywhere. we know that. it's a little shock. there's gambling at mr. rick's. the germans want the same special relationship of no spying agreement that we have with the uk. at the same time, i think there really is anger about they said the flash point was merkel's cell phone. >> yeah, i think that's right, andrea. it's not just anger but embarrassment on their part. remember, the first allegations of potential nsa surveillance in europe came up during the summer. at the time the germans were among those saying we understand it. we think as a dispute it's ebbing away. our concerns have been more or less met. i think there's now a feeling they climbed down and didn't make a huge case out of it in the summer only to find out it was more persuasive, lasted longer and involved the top official and their government. so they have a lot of egg on their own face. what was interesting about the long article der spiegel published over the weekend,
of the region, the last measure of american foreign policy should be how it is received by the house. if there were a price for most irresponsible foreign policy, it would be surely be awarded to saudi arabia. it is the nation most responsible for the rise of islamic radicalism and militancy across the world. over the past four decades, the kingdoms immense oil wealth has been used to underwrite the export of an extreme intolerant and violent version of islam. go anywhere in the world from germany to indonesia and you will find islamic centers flush with saudi money spouting intolerance and hate. a top treasury official said -- >> if i could snap my fingers and cut off funding from one country, it would be saudi arabia. >> hillary clinton confirmed that saudi arabia remained a critical financial base for terrorism. she also said that there was only limited action to stop flow of funds from taliban and other such terrorists groups. saudi arabia was one of three countries in the world to recognize and support the taliban-led government in afghanistan until the 9/11 attacks. it is also
outer liberal economic policies and probably they don't like he is anti-russian foreign policy and at a certain moment he will have to choose because, yes, he made the capitol in russia but he will continue his own foreign policy and so far he has been maneuvering between russia and the west. but if he is serious about joining the european union or having associate membership, the union will require him to worsen relations with russia and that happened to ukraine and not avoided by georgia. >> in the uk the defunct news of the world newspaper rebecca brooks and kandi corazon are in court to stand trial on phone hacking charges so let's go to roy who is outside of the court in london and tell us what is going to happen, roary. >> reporter: david, this starts with a bang on the first day is mostly procedural so we are likely to see the swearing in of the jury and we will get an outline really of how the trial is going to proceed. we won't actually have much of the nitty gritty of the trial or evidence or anything like that on the first day. we will see the defendants in court. 8
an impact on u.s. foreign policy, on the way it talks and discusses and not only that, collects information, and it's also having an impact in the fact that, you know, lots of people in europe, especially leaders, are not cutting the u.s. as much slack as they might have done in the past. partly, they're saying, because the u.s. under the obama administration, is backing off a lot of the burden sharing, a lot of the heavy lifting that traditionally the u.s. has done in support of its allies over the past. >> because of the fallout, bought of the anger amongst the world leaders, julian, do you think someone's head should roll over this? >> well, we're going to see what the administration does. i think two things to remember. president obama himself raised a lot of the expectations about the differences with how he would conduct national security operations and those resonated both here and around the world. so it might be that in the end, he tries to blame someone. he himself now by -- with this report coming out that he ordered this to stop, it's something of an admission this shouldn't be
interests as a result of this revelation is as important as the foreign policy consequences, because what european company will want to use american networking capacity and other types of computer technologies as a result of this. finally, one other thing. i'm really embarrassed for this white house. i feel awfully sorry for the president because this is basically going to undermine the -- our transatlantic alliance for many years to come, just at a time when we're negotiating an iran agreement. where our european allies are so important to us. >> meanwhile there are some republican leaders coming out, republican congressman peter king defending the u.s. spying on world leaders. take a listen to this. >> i think the president should stop apologizing, stop being defensive. the reality is the nsa has saved thousands of lives, not just in the united states but also in france and germany and throughout europe. and we're not doing this for the fun of it. this is to gather valuable intelligence which helps not just us but also helps the europeans. >> so, mark, we have allies that are upset with
with a as reaction to bush who was so dumb. this guy is a genius. is he a policy guy. he is not a policy guy. he is a talker. >> that is it for the panel. stay tuned to see how the president played the odds in foreign policy. at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in. with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promises. >>> finally tonight, president obama is under fire from world leaders for tapping their cell phones and listening in. one show points out he is really just staying true to his own word. >> true partnership and true progress require constant work and sustained sacrifice. they require allies who will listen to each other, learn from each other, and most of all trust each other. [cheers and applause] >> listen, learn, trust, you know, two out of three ain't bad. >> thanks for inviting us into your home tonight. that is it for this "special report," fair, balanced and unafraid. don't forget tomorrow is a big day on capitol hill.
million of us are being spied on as well as the rest of the world. if you want to talk about foreign-policy, i have the democrats and republicans, it is not good. we need to take a step back, look at what we're doing and then make wise choices. thanks. chris from california is next. chris on our independent line. think this nsa program has been way out of line since it began during the bush administration where the american people find out about it. president in our past history called nixon who is spying on a hotel and he was forced to resign. whether obama knew about this or not, he supposed to know this and if he did not know he should resign for lack of ability to do his job heard this is insane what we're doing. we are spying on every human being possible am a friend, foe, everything. example that we are sending to children. do think we can rebuild trust in this issue? inler: i think the trust this country has been down the tubes for the last 15 or 20 years. you can show many examples of that. thes not just the nsa, now tpp has been going on for years now. nobody in this country knows
to congressional arm-twisting, the big reform to incremental change and the big foreign policy ambition to cultivating head of state relationships. it means that obama has appeared to be caught unaware as controversies envelop his administration. the west wing that he runs seems more like liabilities than benefits, raising questions about how much information obama wants and how he receives it. this president doesn't seem to be as relentlessly curious about the process of government. from peter baker -- peter baker writes, those cases underscore the difficult choices in what to tell a president. aides determined that it would be inappropriate for the president to have advanced knowledge of the irs investigation. beresident should not involved in such investigations or law-enforcement cases because it could politicize them. john tuck said he was not bothered asnot as other republicans about mr. obama's not knowing about the problems with the health-care system in advance. i would never put the finger on somebody saying they should have known or might have known. what difference does it m
, canada, australia. ashley: has this hurt the u.s. reputation? there has been a number of foreign policy or lack of foreign policy moves that hurt the u.s. reputation. is this another one just added to the pile so to speak? >> if this had come along alone it might have gotten sorted out. i think a lot of europeans and others are quite concerned about the veracity, franklily of the, the administration. and, how much you can rely on their promises. with respect to syria, we virtually said yes, we're going to help. we turned it off at the last minute. it is almost, sometimes, as if it is better to be an enemy of the united states than a friend if you look the way mubarak was dealt with on the one hand. and the way assad is being dealt with on the other. tracy: just to follow up on that, in your article in the journal i thought was so telling. you wrote, we were not leading but rather stumbling along behind. stumbling like a little kid that doesn't know which way to go. is that how you think the world perceives us? >> to some extent, yes. we need to work on this working closely with the alli
, that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states, to our conduct of foreign policy, to the fed's matters, to economic matters and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> reporter: the director of national intelligence, james clapper announced overnight he's declassifying a trove of documents about collection under the foreign intelligence surveillance act or fisa. later today, clapper and the head of the nsa, keith alexander will be testifying on the hill. kate, we can expect them to face hard questions as well. we'll try to ask some of our own. >> absolutely. review on multiple fronts but what will come of it? jim sciutto, great to see you. thank you so much. >>> the obama administration is facing ongoing criticism on another front. obama care. the president'sed visors are fighting back on twitter, challenging claims millions of people could lose coverage because of the law. the administration is extending the signup window by six weeks. senior white house correspondent brianna keilar is here with the very latest. >> that signup deadline now march 31st. it had been februa
, there are real risks of disclosure. so it's kind of the classic foreign policy dilemma that you have very modest tactical benefits and a huge strategic risk. that has now blown up in our faces. >> bill? >> i would say if you're going to eavesdrop on phone calls of the german chancellor, that has to be something that the president of the united states authorizes and thinks frankly is worth the risk of exposure, as nick says. you can't just have the bureaucracy doing that. i would like to know, did this president or the previous president, for that matter, sanction that and if so, maybe they thought it was worth it. i don't have a principled problem with listening to other people's calls, even some allies, if we think it's important. you shouldn't do it in a haphazard way which generally damages relations with the real ally. >> do you think it's true that the president of the united states would not know that the nsa is listening in to angela merkel's phone conversations? >> you know, i'm a little mystified by that. i talked today to a former senior cia official and asked about that, and this pers
comment on our foreign policy by former vice president dick cheney. listen to this. >> i think our friend no longer count on us, no longer trust us and our adversaries don't fear us. that is the cornerstone and base of u.s. ability and influence. if we're not heavily involved there, if we turned our back on the region, if we have a president who believes we overreacted to the terrorism attacks on 9/11, i think the saudis, the emiratis, egyptians, many in that part of the world no longer have confidence in the united states. martha: does this president lack confidence or even respect to some extent from some of these world leaders and is that part of the reason that we're seeing this kind of outrage about all this? >> by all accounts president obama does not have close personal relationships with foreign leaders the way reagan did with thatcher or bill clinton did with tony blair or president bush with angela merkel for that matter or with sarkozy. in the middle east he had very inconsistent policy for instance with syria. he basically told france by all accounts that we were going to atta
in broad daylight. >>> president obama is hearing tough new criticism of his foreign policy. in an interview yesterday former vice president dick cheney said he doesn't trust the president -- trust the president to stand behind israel and keep nuclear weapons out of iran. >> you don't believe he has the best interests of the united states in terms of our national security in the middle east? >> i don't believe he does. >> you don't believe his word can be trusted? >> correct. >> that's a serious question. >> it certainly is. >> to say that to the president of the united states. >> that's right. >> in a democratic country. >> but i think this president is doing enormous damage to our standing, to our capacity to influence events. we are rapidly eroding our ability to have any impact on what's going on in the middle east. the last time we walked away from afghanistan, for example, back in the '80s, we'd been there heavily involved supporting the move against the soviets but then we turned around after the soviets departed. they got a civil war and osa
this very important foreign-policy matter going forward. >> time for some fresh thinking in terms of u.s. policy in the post-pullout? >> we are focused on providing the necessary assistance to a iraq to help them combat terrorism as well as the broader assistance to provide through the strategic framework agreement. that encompasses not just the security relationship, but an economic and political relationship. part of this -- part of what a for has been going to many years now is the efforts to resolve the political differences and divisions within that country peacefully and through politics rather than through file it conflict. violent conflict. the forces of al qaeda have been trying to disrupt that throughout this time. it is important that in spite of the differences that exist politically in the iraq that the parties and groups continues to resolve their differences peacefully, which further isolates the activities that al qaeda and him and straights what they are for all to see, which terribleeking of violence on innocent civilians which is damaging to every iraqi. our systems
the region. but foreign policy is not a zero-sum game. if we can find ways to resolve disputes peacefully, we are wise to explore them. engagement is not appeasement, nor is it containment. we know what those are, we know where they lead, and we will not pursue them. and president obama has repeatedly made clear that words are not enough. action must match words. we understand why this is so important to so many people. because we've all been to yad vashem. earlier this year, i had the opportunity to revisit yad vashem. i had been there before, but this time was special for, because i brought my son, ziller, with me. i wanted him to see the harsh realities of the depths of evil, and the beautiful tribute to the victims of the past. yad vashem is an instruction for future generations -- like all great memorials. a warning to never ever again stand idly by in the face of hatred and bigotry. we know that ridding our world of hatred takes more than just work, imagination, and so on. it will always demand commitment, sacrifice, and courage. it demands that we must continue to march our armies of t
, that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states, to our conduct, our foreign policy, to defense matters, to economic matters, and i am a strong supporter of it. >> the director of national intelligence james clapper announced overnight he is declassifying a trove of documents about the collection under the foreign intelligence surveillance acts, or first ssa. later today, clapper and the head of the nsa, keith alexen direction will be testify on the hill about that program. you can be sure they're going to be getting questions about spying overseas, how far it should go and what limits the administration is considering placing on it now. >> this is a huge story, especially in europe. jim sciutto, thank you very much. >>> republican senator lindsey graham turning up the heat on the obama administration for its handling of last year's benghazi rror attack and its aftermath. the outspoken critic of the administration is threatening to block all presidential nomination, before the senate until survivors of that attack testify before congress. take a listen to graham on f
in just one month. how this could affect u.s. foreign policy on fighting terrorism and is other key issues, we expect to hear more on the white house news conference scheduled to begin in 90 minutes kyla campbell ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and diane feinstein plans to give continued authority. she heads the senate select committee on intelligence. they are drafting legislation to put restrictions on the nsa phone records program. the legislation would allow the nsa to continue gathering records listing the numbers, time and duration of all u.s. telephone calls but not their content the. >>> time is 8:15. well, this week marks the first anniversary of superstorm sandy. one of the nation's worst natural disaster. this morning historic ellis island will reopen for the first time since that big storm slammed into new york harbor. superstorm sandy ravaged the island, left it without power for several months. the clean up work is far from over despite the reopening today. ellis island is best known as you know for ushering millions of immigrants into the united states over the years. now, a lot oa
formulate an effective foreign and national security policy. we're looking for that. so we're looking for information that helps us -- >>. >> ifill: that's pretty broad though. >> of course it's broad. we're looking for information that help us understand how other countries think and how they plan to operate. and that can make our relationship with them much more affective and productive. >> ifill: is that what european nations are looking for as well? >> i think that european nations it are looking for some supervision and some limits. the nsa sucks in as much information as it does partly because it can. partly because of new information technologies, the internet, wireless, cell phones. and the europeans simply have a political culture that is more sensitive to privacy than in the united states. >> ifill: so they handle their intelligence differently than we would necessarily. >> well, they haven't made much more progress on these kinds of issues among themselves than they have with us. they don't have an eu-wide approach to intelligence. they have their individual member states b
of foreign leaders, but it is awkward and may even force a change in policy. >> we give them policy direction but what we've seen over the last two years is the capacity continues to develop and expand which is why i'm initiating a review now to make sure that was a are able to do does not necessarily mean it is what they should be doing. >> washington's defense of the surveillance program is that everyone spies on everyone and a ay -- anyway but this is question of scale. nobody does a as big as america. >> i spoke with democratic congressman brad sherman who sits on the foreign affairs committee. mr. sherman, thank you for joining me. did you hear anything in the hearings today that justified to you what the surveillance programs might have been doing think you have a series of interconnected and somewhat reckless decisions. of first was to give many the 500,000 people a security clearance access to far more information than they would have had before we began chanting that we need to connect the dots so that everyone needs to have access to everything. engage in expect to the secret activi
on. the reason why it's important is because it is a policy issue that has very broad implications. it could put the united states in a difficult position. >> woodruff: yesterday dianne feinstein expressed outrage over spying on friendly foreign leaders. she says white house officials assured her it's going to end. the white house said only that a review is underway. for his part, the president declined to address reports that he did not learn of the practice until last summer. instead, he told the fusion news channel -- >> well, first of all, i'm not confirming a bunch of assumptions that have been made in the press. there are strict law about what we do internally and that was the initial concern about the snoend disclosures. internationally, there are less constraints on how our intelligence teams operate. >> woodruff: meanwhile, a bipartisan group of lawmakers called today for an end to most of the n.s.a.'s surveillance with phone records and e-mails. one of those lawmakers calling for limits to spying is wisconsin republican jim sensenbrenner chairman of the house crime and te
afternoon. i am going to start the first afternoon session. the topic is foreign intelligence surveillance. we are pleased to have as theesses, james baker with department of justice, office of intelligence, and policy review. judge james carr, a senior federal judge of the united states district court and formerly a judge from 2002 2008. sillinger, a former doj attorney at the computer crime and electrical property section. these make your remarks and then afterwards we will have five minutes for each of the board members. >> thank you very much. i would like to thank the board for inviting me back. it is an honor to be here and an honor to be able to discuss these kinds of issues in this type of setting. i appreciate the opportunity. i have just a couple of quick comments. is focus of our discussion on 702 of the fisa amendment act patriot act.e while these are very important statutorily authorized and judicial he reviewed surveillance programs involving the collections and communications -- collection of commit occasions and to medications data with many americans, they are only part of
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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